Type in Logo Design: How to Get Creative with Your Type Placement

Last Updated: June 21, 2021

After hours of sketching and vectoring, you’ve designed a really awesome icon, only to sit back and realize you still have to put the company name and tagline…somewhere. While it may seem customary to place the brand name neat and centered beneath the logo, there are several unique and playful ways to incorporate type in a logo design. Check out some of the examples below of how designers resolved the type dilemma.



Type in Icon


Who says icon and type must be strangers to each other? Incorporating type into your icon is a great way to make your logo stand out from the crowd while giving character to your typeface.





Type/Icon Collissions


Type and icon collisions make for some unexpected, but highly clever and memorable marks. Depending on the design, the icon may be able to used as a standalone mark, and/or integrated with the type.





Type Overlaid on Icon


Type on top of your logo’s icon is a bold statement, but be sure to resolve any awkward overlaps that might occur visually. Also doublecheck how your logo will look like in black and white, in case the overlay might cause readability issues.





Type Overlaid on Icon


Type on top of your logo’s icon is a bold statement, but be sure to resolve any awkward overlaps that might occur visually. Also doublecheck how your logo will look like in black and white, in case the overlay might cause readability issues.





Type/Icon Interaction


Creating an interaction between both type and icon is a great opportunity to instill personality into the brand while making the type and icon work more homogeneously. You can create interaction through the position and angles placed on the type and/or icon.





Type Framing Icon


Instead of resorting to type sitting straight from left to right, opt for a baseline or alignment that molds to the form of the icon. Framing works great in emblems but can also work with an icon/type pairing alone.





Type Side-Locked to Icon


Side-locking (or simply aligning) type to the side of an icon is a great solution for long, multi-line titles and/or resolving lock-ups.





Type Stacked Below Icon


Conversely, stacking the type below the icon is another way to resolve lockups. This can shift the logo to a more vertical layout, but be careful of getting too tall and/or narrow.

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